10 votes
Accepted

Podemos nos "cansar fácil", "esquecer fácil" ou até "desistir fácil"?

Fácil já vem reconhecido, e sem qualquer advertência, como advérbio no Aulete, no Michaelis e no Houaiss (Lisboa, 2003), que trancrevo (desabreviando as abreviaturas): fácil [...] advérbio 7 ...
Jacinto's user avatar
  • 44.9k
10 votes

how to say cigarette colloquially in Portuguese

"Cigarro" is both formal and colloquial. Some slang words and phrases are: "pito", "crivo", "de branco" ([dressed] in white) - any cigarette "mata-rato&...
Luís Henrique's user avatar
9 votes

Use of the arroba in Portuguese to mean "attention"

I've never, ever seen anyone using the @ sign with that intention. A lengthy search on the most popular social networks also did not yield any results (in fact, using @ on them has proved itself quite ...
Ramon Melo's user avatar
  • 1,853
6 votes
Accepted

Qual a origem do uso do verbo “ser” para enfatizar que alguma coisa foi feita ao invés de outra coisa?

Essas estruturas chamam-se clivadas de SER, e alguns linguistas sugerem “que elas são [pseudoclivadas] reduzidas, resultado do apagamento de certos elementos” (Anderléia Longhin¹, 1999, p. 108), como ...
Jacinto's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Era uma vez um gato maltês tocava piano e falava francês

There are tons of these, by color. xadrez by the way means checkered and there are no checkered cats, except in drawings. Such as in the book Era uma vez um gato xadrez...: Era uma vez um gato xadrez....
Lambie's user avatar
  • 2,675
3 votes
Accepted

Is it acceptable to substitute "ter" for "haver" or "existir" in formal contexts?

I'm not a linguist, but I'll try to answer your question from a native speaker's point of view. Also, since I'm not Portuguese, I don't think I'm in a position to answer your fourth question. As for ...
D. Tiglea's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"talvez a ti te contassem" é gramaticalmente correto? É aceito apenas coloquialmente? Ou trata-se de licença poética?

O papel dessa redundância parece ser o de enfatizar o objeto. Acredito que não é estritamente gramático, ou seja, que é coloquialismo ou mesmo licença poética. Coloquialmente, se não soasse estranho, ...
stafusa's user avatar
  • 11.9k
3 votes

how to say cigarette colloquially in Portuguese

"cigarro" is the most common way to refer to cigarettes in pt=BR, in both formal and informal environments. There are several other names but none of them are widely used throughout the country. ...
Centaurus's user avatar
  • 24.3k
2 votes

What is the most accurate translation for "vai dar" and "falar merda"?

"Dar", just like "to give", has many meanings, especially when part of expressions. Some of these meanings are (Aulete 13., 28.; 21, Priberam 9., 11., 22.): to cause, to generate, ...
stafusa's user avatar
  • 11.9k
2 votes

Qual a origem da gíria “mode”?

Sim, é coloquialismo brasileiro. Outras grafias incluem "modi" e "mó de". Mais que gíria, é parte do dialeto de certas regiões, especialmente do interior do país e do nordeste. ...
stafusa's user avatar
  • 11.9k
2 votes

how to say cigarette colloquially in Portuguese

In addition to the other answers, one may also use the word "pigas (m)" (despite the "s", this is the singular form), as in Me vê um pigas? (May I have a cigarette?) I believe this is specific to ...
Hartigor's user avatar
2 votes

Use of the arroba in Portuguese to mean "attention"

I noticed you asked particularly about its usage in Brazil. I'm from Portugal, but I can tell you this: growing up, people from my generation (I am now 20 years old) used to talk via the software "...
peconsti's user avatar
1 vote

Is it acceptable to substitute "ter" for "haver" or "existir" in formal contexts?

None of those example is used in Portugal. As said in the linked question, the verb ter os always used with a subject - that can be omitted - while the sentence don't have a subject, in which case the ...
theMage's user avatar
  • 41

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