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What historical or literary Portuguese works can give me examples of the pejorative use of the term «Noble Creole»?

I found the phrase «nobre crioulo» employed by a Portuguese university Ph.D professor, directed against a colleague of the same profession and grade. This colleague was born in Latin America. The phrase was used to refer to non-European title of the Latin American professor in front of students. Thus, the phrase was used in Portugal, by a Portuguese professor of history and in an improper professional situation.

According to oral sources, which were also unable to refer to a written source, this use would be linked to the way Brazilian nobles were identified, whose titles were conferred by Pedro I of Brazil, when they came to Lisbon. In 1822, after the unfortunate loss of Brazil, may this use have taken place? Does the history teacher refer to this use?

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    Welcome Rui! I suggest you add a Portuguese translation of Noble Creole to make tour question clearer to fellow Portuguese speakers. I, as a native speaker, am not sure of what Noble Creole means. – gmauch Jan 19 '18 at 12:47
  • Aqui se vê na tradução de um livro do autor Gabriel García Marquez:O amor e outros demônios: editoraescuta.com.br/pulsional/134_01.pdf Digo outra vez: o termo não se usa em português. – Lambie Jan 22 '18 at 15:09
  • What do you mean "the" pejorative use???? It means the descendants of Europeans born in Latin America/New World. And in Spanish (not Portuguese!), it means: nobles criollos. The term is not used in Portuguese per se. It is used in Spanish. Mas se diria em português nesse contexto e traduzido: nobres criolos. – Lambie 1 hour ago – Lambie Jan 22 '18 at 16:17
  • Maybe I have to expand the context in which the phrase was used. The phrase «nobre crioulo» was employed by a Portuguese University Ph.D Professor and it was directed against a colleague of the same profession and grade. This colleague was born in America Latina. The phrase was used to refer to non-European title of the Latin American Professor in front of students. – user2781 Jan 30 '18 at 15:42
  • Thus, the phrase was used in Portugal, by a Portuguese Professor of History and in an improper professional situation. According to oral sources, which were also unable to refer a written source, this use would be linked to the way how were identified the Brazilians nobles, which titles were conferred by Pedro I of Brazil, when they came to Lisbon. In 1822, after the unfortunate loss of Brazil, may this use have taken place? Does the history teacher refer to this use? – user2781 Jan 30 '18 at 15:43
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"Crioulo" (Portuguese) and "criollo" (Spanish) meant originally "native", and became quite usual in the American colonies of Portugal and Spain, to denote whatever originated in the colony itself from what was metropolitan, or otherwise foreign. But from that point their usage diverged.

In New World Spanish, "criollo" ended by denoting the part of local elite already born in the colonies, as opposed to those newly arrived from Spain. I suppose this is the possible context of "noble criollo", though the most common usage is "elite criolla". (It certainly is the context of the quote by García Marquez that Lambie linked — in which it was poorly translated to Portuguese as... "?crioulo nobre").

In Brazil (to the partial exception of Rio Grande do Sul, where the term has a wider meaning, somewhat similar to the original one), in contrast, "crioulo" became almost exclusively associated with slaves or free Blacks born in Brazil, in contrast to those imported from Africa. In this context, it is often a derogatory word (perhaps the closest Portuguese equivalent to "nigger", though it isn't nearly as callous as the "n-word").

Perhaps you are mixing the two languages, one in which "criollo" often refers to a sector of the landed oligarchy — rich and powerful people, and another in which it basically means a Black (and almost by definition, a poor, non-noble) person?

Edit (regarding Rui's new comments on his question):

The phrase «nobre crioulo» was employed by a Portuguese University Ph.D Professor and it was directed against a colleague of the same profession and grade. This colleague was born in America Latina.

Brazil is part of Latin America; was the colleague born in Brazil, or in one of the Spanish-speaking countries? If the latter, your professor was deriding his colleague origins among the elite criolla. It would be better if he used the Spanish pronunciation. If the former, then it seems that the Portuguese professor made a mistake, assuming the usage in Brazil is similar to the rest of Latin America, and delivered a quite harsher insult than intended, bordering into racism, especially if the foreign professor has a darker skin.

According to oral sources, which were also unable to refer a written source, this use would be linked to the way how were identified the Brazilians nobles, which titles were conferred by Pedro I of Brazil, when they came to Lisbon.

Not in Brazil that I know.

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