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I have searched dict.cc and google-translate. I have even asked my Portuguese friend. But apparently there is no Portuguese word for sparkler.

Is there?

PS: This is what I mean: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparkler

3

You can see here sometimes we don't translate "sparkler" in Portugal... When we translate, we use "Foguetes Mágicos", as you can see here and here.

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    Not to be confused with fogos de artifício/artificiais, which are the exploding aerial pyrotechnic displays. I mention this only because the English word fireworks is occasionally used in a way that includes both things that the two different Portuguese terms specify distinctly. – tchrist Jan 9 '18 at 16:36
  • Jorge B. This sounds like a comment, not an answer. – Centaurus May 2 at 18:30
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    It can be named "estrelinha de ouro", fogoscaruaru.com.br/estrelinhadeouro – Gabriel Araújo Sep 16 at 11:51
  • fogos de artificio/feux d'artifice are fireworks in English. – Lambie Nov 1 at 15:14
3

The name of the object is foguete.

This is a decoration mostly used (in Portugal at least) for birthday cakes.

Note that faísca would be spark, not sparkler.

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my portuguese friend has done some more research and he came up with the translation "foguete mágico"

Look: https://www.google.de/search?q=foguete+magico

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  • Tobias if you disagree with your accepted answer you can chose another one that you want. – Jorge B. Jan 9 '18 at 14:55
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Actually, in Brazil, we don't use sparkler as people do in other countries. We only use it as candles on top of a cake when it is someone's birthday. For this reason, the only name used for it is Vela Estrela, which can be translated to something like Star Candle.

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  • vela estrelinha – Lambie Nov 1 at 15:19
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The Brazilian Portuguese form for the word sparker varies according to the size (thickness). Cascade Candle for the fine ones and Volcano Candle for the thick ones, however the English term "sparker" is constantly used, depending on the manufacturer.

The literal translation from German wunderkerze into Portuguese would be a miracle candle, but if you use the wunderkerze translator it will result in a sparker and not a Miracle Candle. Logo sparker = vela cascata e vela vulcão.

  • Vela cascata = Cascade Candle

  • Vela vulcão = Volcano Candle

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In my region of Brazil, we kinda use it. Not always, but sometimes. Still never have I ever really given it a name or hear someone calling it by some name. If, for example, my mom wanted me to give her the sparkler, she would simply refer to it as "aquilo que faz faísca" (that thing that sparkles). I would think that in other regions of Brazil people would refer to it as some composite noun using the word "vela" (candle).

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    You "kind of" use what? – Lambie Nov 1 at 15:20
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    I was saying we kinda use sparklers. – luka marçal Nov 2 at 23:47

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