7

Particularly for:

0

There is a distinction in sports terms between the two major translation markets. In Brazilian Portuguese, the main trend is to keep it as close as the English term as possible:

  • "tiebreak" (sometimes "tiebreaker") for tiebreaker set
  • "game" / "game point" for game / game point
  • "set" / "set point" for set / set point
  • "partida" or "jogo" / "match point" for match / match point
  • "deuce" for deuce
  • "bye" for bye (when a player advances without having to play)
  • "wildcard" for wildcard

In European Portuguese, it is generally preferred to find a local expression whenever it is possible:

  • "set decisivo" for tiebreaker set
  • "jogo" / "ponto do jogo" for game / game point
  • "set" / "ponto do set" for set / set point
  • "partida" / "ponto da partida" for match / match point
  • "iguais" for deuce
  • "avanço automático" for bye (when a player advances without having to play)
  • "coringa" for wildcard

However, due to geopolitical and economical influences, the Brazilian mindset is gaining ground over the European one, and quickly. I want to keep this answer as short as possible, but I can comment on them if you believe they are needed for context.

Terms which are common for both countries:

  • "vantagem confirmada" for advantage set
  • "zero" for love (but "zero a zero" for 0-0)
  • all numbers are said in local language:

    • "quinze" or "15" for 15
    • "trinta" or "30" for 30
    • "quarenta" or "40" for 40
      OBS: Portuguese language prefers numbers written in full.
  • "vantagem" for both advantage in / advantage out

  • "break point" / "duplo break point" / "triplo break point" for break point / double break point / triple break point
  • "ace" for ace
  • "falta" / "falta dupla" for fault / double fault
  • "quadra de grama" / "quadra de saibro" / "quadra de cimento" for grass court / clay court / hard court
    OBS: it is usual to drop the "quadra de", e.g., "Roland Garros é jogado no saibro" for Roland Garros is played on clay courts

  • "serviço" / "primeiro serviço" / "segundo serviço" for service / first service / second service

  • "fora" for out
  • "voleio" / "largadinha" for volley / drop shot
    OBS: every other play is called by its English name: "stroke", "slice", "smash", "lob"...
  • "In European Portuguese, it is generally preferred to find a local expression whenever it is possible"? What? – Jorge B. Mar 9 '17 at 23:54
  • @JorgeB. There are way more properly translated terms in PT-PT than in PT-BR, not only in sports. Perhaps a biased point of view, but that's how it looks like. – Ramon Melo Mar 10 '17 at 0:16
  • 1
    Ramon that's not true, in tennis like in IT we use mostly English terms like «game point», «set por tiebreak», «framework», «layout»,etc. You can't assume that us will translate everything. You can't answer based on your guess... Like «set decisivo» I never heard here. We don't use «voleio» we use «volley» instead. You have a lot of mistakes on pt_PT and in your "common" guesses... – Jorge B. Mar 10 '17 at 9:21
  • Em Portugal não temos estas palavras: curinga; quadra; voleio; largadinha. A não ser que os tenhamos só para o ténis? – ANeves wants peace for Monica Mar 10 '17 at 12:51
1

We use some English terms in Portugal like tiebreak and set but you can use all terms in English we will understand them.

  • set por vantagem / set por tiebreak
  • jogo (game point = ponto de jogo )
  • set (set point = ponto de set )
  • partida (match point = ponto de partida)
  • love (don't know, maybe «zero»)
  • 15/30/40
  • iguais
  • vantagem a favor / vantagem contra

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.