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I'm looking for a proverb in Portuguese that conveys the same. I'm not looking for a translation or an explanation. Literally, it means that the hunter who got paid for the bear's skin, and spent the money, and then couldn't catch any bear, found himself in a very awkward position. I'm looking for a similar proverb meaning that you have to follow a certain chronological order so as not to get in trouble.

9

In Portuguese, there is:

Não ponhas a carroça à frente dos bois.

which has an English analogue "(don't) put the cart before the horse", and whose meaning is the same.

7

A good option to talk about someone in that sitution could be:

Não conte com o ovo no “fiofó”* da galinha.

*"fiofó" is a common substitute(slang) for coarse words that refers to butt

It can be translated to english as something like: "Do not count on the egg in the chicken's butt." and it's used when someone do something hastily.

See the examples below:

  • Maria nem recebeu a herança e está comprando uma casa. Está contando com o ovo no "fiofó" da galinha;

  • Não saia comprando tudo no mercado antes de receber o salário. Não conte com o ovo no “fiofó”* da galinha;

As suggested in the comments, another option to this could be:

Não conte com o ovo antes de a galinha pôr.

Avoiding any word that could be considered offensive.

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  • 3
    I believe this should be the accepted answer, as it is more context-specific than não ponha o carro na frente dos bois. The phrase in this answer is more applicable to situations that involve monetary transactions, while não ponha o carro... is more generic. Dec 7 '15 at 2:51
  • 1
    In standard ptBR we would say "não conte com o ovo antes de a galinha por". I would accept an answer saying that.
    – Centaurus
    Dec 25 '15 at 23:25
  • In standard Brazilian Portuguese we wouldn't say "fiofó" or "cu". These words are regionalisms and vulgarisms. No self-respecting actor, professor, or reporter, would use those words in public or on television. They would be the laughing stock of the whole country if they did it.
    – Centaurus
    Dec 27 '15 at 22:30
  • @BellAppLab more applicable to situations that involve monetary transactions is irrelevant to the question. (But I agree with you that this answer is a better and more specific match for “catch the bear before you sell its skin”.)
    – ANeves
    Dec 28 '15 at 11:34
  • @Luis, I agree with you, but in your original question, you didn't cite any context for use the expression, so I think that in informal situations, the use of "fiofó" or even "cu" is absolutely appropriate. Anyway, you already gave us another good option avoiding these words in your second comment and I put it in my answer
    – James
    Dec 29 '15 at 10:45
2

In Portugal, we have these two proverbs:

  • "Não contes com o ovo no cu da galinha."
  • "Não contes os pintos senão depois de nascidos." (less common)
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  • 1
    In standard Brazilian Portuguese we wouldn't say "fiofó" or "cu". These words are regionalisms and vulgarisms. No self-respecting actor, professor, or reporter, would use those words in public or on television. They would be the laughing stock of the whole country if they did it
    – Centaurus
    Dec 27 '15 at 22:32
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    I should state that I was writing in pt-PT. Dec 27 '15 at 22:33
  • In Portugal, the word "cu" means simply "bunda". For its meaning in Brasil (it's a vulgar word, like @Luis noted), see this question: portuguese.stackexchange.com/q/1337/157
    – ANeves
    Dec 28 '15 at 11:37
  • 2
    The user didn't as for a saying appropriate in Brazil; rather, he asked for an expression in Portuguese. Dec 28 '15 at 18:49

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